Algonquin Everyday Life:
Before Europeans came into contact, most Algonquian settlements lived by hunting and fishing, but a lot of people also supplemented their diet by cultivating corn, beans, and squash. From April through October, natives birds and their eggs. In July and August they gathered strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and nuts. In September they split small groups and moved up the streams to the forest. There the men hunted beaver caribou, moose and white tailed deer.
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Religion:
The Algonquin tribe used to practice the religion of Midewiwin, the secretive religion of the aboriginal groups of the Maritimes, New England, and the Great Lakes regions in North America. Its practitioners are called Midew and the practices of Midewiwin referred to as Mide. Occasionally, male Midew are called Midewinini. Midewiwin is based on the world view (religious beliefs) of the Ojiba people. An important ceremony for the Algonquin's was the "Feast of the Dead." This was a war dance performed for visiting tribes, which provided an occasion for the strengthening of relations between villages and the exchange of gifts, like beaver furs, and wood carvings.
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Area Inhabited:
The Algonquin was located in the Ottawa River Valley which right now is the border between Ontario and Quebec. It was in the north western side of the USA. Some groups lived in southwestern Quebec and south eastern Ontario.
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Culture/Arts/Technology:
An important ceremony for the Algonquin's was the "Feast of the Dead." This was a war dance performed for visiting
tribes, which provided an occasion for the of relations between villages and the exchange of gifts, like beaver furs, and wood carvings. When they made the wood carvings some of there tools were sharpened rock, which to use it they had to find soft wood, the things back then were very outdated. Now they have advanced in technology, they are the ones that made the first canoe, then later on many other designs of the canoe were invented by them. Algonquin’s also liked to sing and dance. They also told stories and made baskets that were made by weaving string and thick grass together.


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Politics:
Each town, or kingdom, was led by a chief, or king. Sometimes, when kings controlled more than one town, a person called a, regent did the king's bidding when he's not there. Sometimes they had some weird rules, like children had to take bathes in freezing water to make them stronger.
The Algonquin area had divisions, which were called reserves. A reserve is land that is legally owned. Each reserve had an ogema or ogima, which was the ruler. The ogema translates to chief. The ruler ship passed from father to son, or another close relative. The political organization really helped the Algonquin thrive and kept order in the community.